Your Browser is Out of Date

Nytro.ai uses technology that works best in other browsers.
For a full experience use one of the browsers below

Home > Servers > Specialty Servers > Third-party Analysis

Third-party Analysis

documents (7)

  • PowerEdge
  • edge
  • telecom
  • XR4000
  • XR8000

Optimizing Performance Per Watt with Dell PowerEdge XR Servers

Manya Rastogi Manya Rastogi

Thu, 17 Aug 2023 18:45:13 -0000

|

Read Time: 0 minutes

Executive Summary

With power and cooling costs accounting for increasingly large portions of IT budgets, IT departments looking to minimize total cost of ownership (TCO) are making power efficiency a priority when choosing server hardware. This white paper will examine the power efficiency of Dell Edge servers in the multi-node, 2U form factor, a form factor that is one of the most popular in many Edge and Telecom use cases because of the balance it strikes between density and expandability. This white paper will present and analyze power efficiency results for several Dell current-generation PowerEdge XR servers and also illustrate how those results compare on various parameters with a prior-generation Dell Edge server. 

The environmental conditions for telecom edge computing are typically vastly different than those at centralized data centers. Telecom edge computing sites might, at best, consist of little more than a telecommunications closet with minimal or no HVAC. Thus, ruggedized, front-access servers are ideal for such deployments. The Dell PowerEdge servers checks all of the boxes.

Dell Technologies commissioned Tolly to evaluate the power efficiency of Dell’s XR8000, XR4000, XR5610, and XR11 servers using the industry standard Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC) SPECPower benchmark and compare those to each other.  The SPECPower benchmark measures server-side Java (SSJ) throughput and system power consumption. The benchmark calculates SSJ operations per watt of system power consumed. All analysis was based on public data submitted to the SPEC and published on their website.[1]   

The Dell PowerEdge XR8000, XR4000, XR5610, and XR11 are all highly-capable edge servers but offer customers different options with respect to form factor, CPU specifications, and power efficiency/cost.  The following summary tables provide insights into the value each offers from a different perspective of performance, cost, and energy usage. 

The first table, below, summarizes the raw performance results calculated by SPECPower. As one would expect, the newer systems deliver higher performance per watt the older systems. The XR5610[2]  and XR11 were measured on 32 cores where the other two systems were measured on 64 cores.

Table 1.  SPECPower - Performance/Watt

The second table, below, analyzes results on a “per core” basis as the various Dell systems have either 32 or 64 cores. The XR4000 results are 26% higher than the XR11 results, the XR8000 results are 42% higher than the XR11, and the XR5610 results are 62% higher than the XR11 roughly tracking the results shown in the previous table for the entire systems.

Table 2.  SPECPower - Performance/CPU Core

The third table, below, calculates watts consumed per CPU core without reference to performance.The XR4000 and the XR11 results are within 2% of each other. The XR8000 results are13% better than the XR11 and the XR5610 results are 7% better than the XR11. Note that the XR11 is powered by an Intel 3rd Gen Xeon SP CPU while the XR4000 is powered by an Intel Xeon-D CPU.

Table 3.  SPECPower - Watts/CPU Core

The fourth table, below, factored in the cost of the CPU into the perf/watt equation. Thus, lower cost CPUs will have higher values in this table when the raw performance is the same as higher cost CPUs. The XR4000 results are 120% better than the XR11 results, the XR8000 results are 110% better than the XR11, and the XR5610 results are 104% better than the XR11.

Table 4.  SPECPower - Perf/Watts/CPU Cost

The fifth table, below, provides links to details of each of the CPUs evaluated.

Table 5.  Dell PowerEdge Server Systems - Intel CPU Detail Links

Competitive Positioning

Based on the publicly available data from spec.org/power, we can see high capacity data intensive workload targeted HPE and Supermicro servers. Although these are not direct competitors to Dell PowerEdge XR servers, it is worthwhile to note that the perf/watt/CPU$ for XR8000 is better than both HPE ProLiant DL360 Gen11 (Intel Xeon Platinum 8480+ 2.0 GHz), HPE ProLiant DL380 Gen 1 (Intel Xeon Platinum 8480+ 2.0 GHz), as well as the Supermicro SYS-621C-TN12R (Intel Xeon Platinum 8490H 1.90GHz). 

Dell XR servers provide solutions for various edge workloads in a short form factor, edge optimized with power efficiency consideration taken into account. 

Air Cooling

Dell created Multi-Vector Cooling (MVC) to maximize the potential of air cooling. It includes control algorithms, thermal and power sensors, component mapped fan zoning and airflow channeling shrouds to balance and intelligently direct airflow across the systems’ components.

New high-performance fans and heatsinks, as well as special airflow-optimized configurations, ensure even high-power CPUs are supported without throttling. 

For more information, go to https://www.dell.com/en-us/blog/better-ways-to-cool-your-poweredge-servers, read this “Direct from Development” (DfD) note https://infohub.delltechnologies.com/p/understanding-thermal-design-and-capabilities-for-the-poweredge-xr8000-server, or view a video on the topic at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rHEXJsX75Y&ab_channel=DellTechnologies

Telecom Edge Computing

Wireless telecom providers world-wide have at least two things in common: seemingly endless growth, and the rapid migration from specialized, proprietary radio access network (RAN) hardware to scalable, software-based vRAN solutions. Over two dozen system operators and nearly 300 related companies and academic institutions are part of the Open RAN Alliance (O-RAN) working together to bring an open solution to the industry.[3]  

The telecom edge, thus, needs ruggedized servers built to resist demanding environmental conditions while delivering significant compute power with cost-efficient use of electric power.

Dell, an acknowledged information technology leader, builds servers that are designed for both the processing requirements and physical deployment requirements of edge servers with a particular focus on telecom applications. In particular, the Dell PowerEdge XR8000 and Dell PowerEdge XR4000 edge servers provides a powerful and flexible selection of configurations focused on the particular needs of the telecom edge.[4]   

  • Built to withstand extreme heat & dust; operating temperature range from -5 to 55C
  • Efficient use of electric power
  • Suitable for shock and vibration of factory floors & construction site
  • Can be deployed in distributed telecom and other extreme environments
  • Short depth (355mm), small form factor
  • Ruggedized; tested for NEBS and MIL-STD
  • Multi-node capable

PowerEdge XR4000: Scalability and Flexibility with HCI Capabilities

The Dell PowerEdge XR4000 Edge Server is part of Dell’s family of purpose-built, ruggedized servers. The PowerEdge XR4000 is built for environments like telecom edge deployment or factory floors where the servers could be subjected to demanding conditions including high temperatures, dust, shock and vibrations. 

The high-performance, multinode XR4000 server was purpose built to address the demands of today’s retail, manufacturing and defense customers. It was designed around a unique chassis and compute sled(s) concept. The actual computer resides in modular 1U or 2U sled form factors. The only shared component between the sleds is power. The server is also designed to support hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI).

The XR4000 is available in two 14" depth “rackable” and “stackable” chassis form factors. The optional nano server sled replaces the need for a virtual witness node.  The in-chassis witness node allows for native, two-node vSAN clusters in the stackable server chassis.

The servers are small form factor, short depth units that can be deployed alone or in multi-node configurations. 

The XR4000 used for this test was an XR4520c 2U compute sled. See table below for key specifications. 

Table 6.  Dell PowerEdge XR4520 Compute Sled Key Specifications

PowerEdge XR8000: Flexible, Innovative, Sled-based RAN-Optimized Server

The Dell PowerEdge XR8000 Edge Server is the newest addition Dell’s family of purpose-built, ruggedized servers. The PowerEdge XR4000 is built for environments like telecom edge environments where the servers could be subjected to demanding conditions including high temperatures, dust, shock and vibrations.

The short-depth XR8000 server, which comes in a sledded server architecture (with 1U and 2U single-socket form factors), is optimized for total cost of ownership (TCO) and performance in O-RAN (radio access network) applications. It is RAN optimized with integrated networking and 1/0 PTP/SyncE support. And its front-accessible design radically simplifies sled serviceability in the field.

The XR8000 offers options for multiple sled form factors with up to four nodes per chassis that can work together or independently. The 2U half-width sled configuration accommodates general purpose compute at the edge / far edge, while the 1U half-width sled configuration is ideal for dense compute and network edge-optimized workloads. 

Table 7.  Dell PowerEdge XR8620 Compute Sled Key Specifications

The XR8000 delivers extended tolerance to heat and cold with enhanced heatsinks and optimized airflow design. The system supports Sapphire Rapids SP and Edge Enhanced (EE) processors with Intel vRAN Boost, on-chip acceleration and includes both DC and AC power supply options and five total power supply unit (PSU) variants

PowerEdge XR5610: All-Purpose, Rugged 1U Edge Server

The Dell PowerEdge XR8000 Edge Server is a new addition Dell’s family of purpose-built, ruggedized servers.  As with the PowerEdge XR8000 and PowerEdge XR4000, the PowerEdge XR5610 is built for environments where the servers could be subjected to demanding conditions including high temperatures, dust, shock and vibrations. The XR5610 is the upgraded successor to the XR11 that is also covered in this report. 

The PowerEdge XR5610 is a 1U, single-socket server designed for target workloads in networking and communication, enterprise edge, military, and defense.  It is well suited for 5G vRAN and ORAN telecom workloads, as well as military and defense deployments and retail AI including video monitoring, IoT device aggregation and PoS analytics. The design specification supports continuous operation in extreme temperatures ranging from -5C to 55C. The design is ruggedized, compliant, and compact.

The server features a filtered smart bezel for dust reduction and the server has undergone MIL810H and NEBS Level 3 testing for handling shocks and vibrations.

Table 8.  Dell PowerEdge XR5610 Key Specifications


SPECPower Workload & Results

The Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC), according to their website, “is a non-profit corporation formed to establish, maintain and endorse standardized benchmarks and tools to evaluate performance and energy efficiency for the newest generation of computing systems. SPEC develops benchmark suites and also reviews and publishes submitted results from our member organizations and other benchmark licensees.”

SPEC has established benchmarks, to date, in some nine different areas. In addition to power, the focus of this report, the benchmarks include Machine Learning, High Performance Computing, Virtualization, and more. 

Server vendors run the benchmark tests in their own labs according to the SPEC benchmark specifications. Vendors may use the results internally and/or they can submit the results to SPEC for review and publication. Once published, the results are freely available and can be used by others in public reports so long as that use complies with the SPEC “Fair Use Policy” for the given benchmark.  

SPECPower_ssj2008 Benchmark

As evidenced by its name, the SPECPower benchmark was issued in 2008.   The workload, represented in the name by “ssj,” is “Server Side Java (SSJ).“  The benchmark drives the load on the target server while also measuring the power consumption of the server.  

While the benchmark allows for different java virtual machines (JVM) to be used in the benchmark, the Oracle JVM is used almost exclusively for the tests. The results document CPU and memory configurations of the systems and reports “submeasurements” of SSL operations at 100% CPU, average watts consumed at 100%, and average watts at idle. The result reported is the overall SSJ operations divided by the watts consumed. 

It is important to note that the test is run at 10 different loads from 10% to 100% in increments of 10% load.  Only the 100% results are displayed in the SPECPower results table but the SPECPower “result” value is an average of all ten tests.

Raw Results

All results referenced in this report are available to the general public on the SPEC site at: https://www.spec.org/power_ssj2008/results. The information in the following tables is excerpted from the public results. The table, below, contains the submeasurements and the final result for each system discussed in the paper. All other results in this paper are calculated using the the SPECPower raw results below.

Table 9.  SPEC SPECPower_ssj2008 Results


Server Specifications

The table, below, contains the server system specifications as shown on the SPEC results website. All systems were tested using Oracle Corporation’s JVM.

Table 10.  Server System Specifications

System BIOS Settings

The tests used Dells recommended BIOS settings for power efficiency. The Dell PowerEdge XR8000 and Dell PowerEdge XR4000 systems both used the following BIOS settings.

Table 11.  Server System BIOS Settings

 XR Series Price/Power Efficiency Claims

The charts below visualize the tabular results presented in the Executive Summary section earlier in this report.  

Performance/Watt (Performance-to-Power-Ratio)

 

Performance/CPU Core


Watt/CPU Core

 

Performance/Watt/CPU Cost

 

About Tolly

The Tolly Group companies have been delivering world-class IT services for more than 30 years. Tolly is a leading global provider of third-party validation services for vendors of IT products, components and services.

You can reach the company by E-mail at sales@tolly.com, or by telephone at +1 561.391.5610.

Visit Tolly on the Internet at: http://www.tolly.com

Terms of Usage

This document is provided, free-of-charge, to help you understand whether a given product, technology or service merits additional investigation for your particular needs. Any decision to purchase a product must be based on your own assessment of suitability based on your needs.  The document should never be used as a substitute for advice from a qualified IT or business professional.  This evaluation was focused on illustrating specific features and/or performance of the product(s) and was conducted under controlled, laboratory conditions. Certain tests may have been tailored to reflect performance under ideal conditions; performance may vary under real-world conditions. Users should run tests based on their own real-world scenarios to validate performance for their own networks.

Reasonable efforts were made to ensure the accuracy of the data contained herein but errors and/or oversights can occur. The test/audit documented herein may also rely on various test tools the accuracy of which is beyond our control. Furthermore, the document relies on certain representations by the sponsor that are beyond our control to verify. Among these is that the software/hardware tested is production or production track and is, or will be, available in equivalent or better form to commercial customers. Accordingly, this document is provided "as is", and Tolly Enterprises, LLC (Tolly) gives no warranty, representation or undertaking, whether express or implied, and accepts no legal responsibility, whether direct or indirect, for the accuracy, completeness, usefulness or suitability of any information contained herein.  By reviewing this document, you agree that your use of any information contained herein is at your own risk, and you accept all risks and responsibility for losses, damages, costs and other consequences resulting directly or indirectly from any information or material available on it. Tolly is not responsible for, and you agree to hold Tolly and its related affiliates harmless from any loss, harm, injury or damage resulting from or arising out of your use of or reliance on any of the information provided herein.

Tolly makes no claim as to whether any product or company described   herein is suitable for investment.   You should obtain your own independent professional advice, whether legal, accounting or otherwise, before proceeding with any investment or project related to any information, products or companies described herein. When foreign translations exist, the English document is considered authoritative. To assure accuracy, only use documents downloaded directly from Tolly.com. No part of any document may be reproduced, in whole or in part, without the specific written permission of Tolly.  All trademarks used in the document are owned by their respective owners.  You agree not to use any trademark in or as the whole or part of your own trademarks in connection with any activities, products or services which are not ours, or in a manner which may be confusing, misleading or deceptive or in a manner that disparages us or our information, projects or developments.

Tolly Report #223124

August 2023

© 2023 TOLLY ENTERPRISES, LLC              www.tolly.com

 

[2] At publication time the XR5610 results were being prepared for submission to SPEC and should appear later in Q3 2023.

Read Full Blog
  • PowerEdge
  • edge
  • telecom
  • XR7620

Abstract: A Path to Virtualization at the Edge

Manya Rastogi Manya Rastogi

Thu, 17 Aug 2023 18:44:54 -0000

|

Read Time: 0 minutes

 

Picking the right edge-computing option from the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR family of servers.

The Ever-Growing Importance of Edge Computing

Data at the edge is rich with information. For the most actionable insights, especially with power-hungry workloads like data analytics and AI/ML, modern organizations capture and analyze data when and where it’s generated—even when that location is in an unforgiving environment far from the data center, such as an oil rig in the North Sea.

Prowess Consulting investigated some of the latest-generation edge-computing servers from Dell Technologies to see how they meet the challenge of keeping up with performance needs in the most hostile environments. We looked at inter- and intra-generational differences, compared specs and VMmark® results, and considered potential use cases.

We found that, for organizations looking for the ideal edge server, the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server delivers high performance, including excellent virtualization capabilities and VMware vSAN™ performance, whereas PowerEdge XR4000 series servers deliver excellent density and deployment flexibility.

The Unforgiving Edge

Workloads like data analytics and AI/ML, which process data at the edge, drive the need for high performance. And a host of environmental and logistical challenges arise when you move that high performance to the edge. For example, a factory that combines Internet of Things (IoT) and digital twin technologies to automate resource allocation and optimize efficiency through analytics and AI will need servers on the factory floor to generate and capture actionable data. And that means exposure to heat, vibration, dust, and more.

How your organization addresses these considerations of performance and durability inherent to edge computing is key. Regardless of your solution, maximizing performance and safeguarding against harsh environments is critical.

The PowerEdge XR7620 Server: A Generational Update

Figure 1 provides a quick visual reference for the servers discussed in this abstract.

Figure 1.  Venn diagram of the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XE2420, XR7620, and XR4000 series servers

PowerEdge XR7620 Server vs. PowerEdge XE2420 Server

Prowess Consulting examined the performance difference between the PowerEdge XR7620 server and its previous generation, the PowerEdge XE2420 server.

The 4th Gen Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors powering the PowerEdge XR7620 server provide several benefits over the 2nd Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors powering the PowerEdge XE2420 server. These benefits include:

  • 1.53x average generation-on-generation performance improvement[1]
  • Up to 1.60x higher input/output operations per second (IOPS) and up to 37% latency reduction for large-packet sequential reads using integrated Intel® Data Streaming Accelerator (Intel® DSA) versus the prior generation[2]
  • Up to 95% fewer cores and 2x higher level-1 compression throughput using integrated Intel® QuickAssist Technology (Intel® QAT) versus the prior generation[3]

This improved performance between generations can also been seen by comparing VMware vSAN deployments. The PowerEdge XE2420 server and the PowerEdge XR7620 server can both implement two-node vSAN deployments. However, as noted previously, the PowerEdge XR7620 server will be more performant with those deployments. This higher level of performance doesn’t just come from the upgraded processor, either. The 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors in the PowerEdge XR7620 server are optimized to take full advantage of the new features and software improvements in VMware vSphere® 8, including GPU- and CPU-based acceleration.

VMmark® Examination of PowerEdge XR7620 and PowerEdge XR4000 Series Servers

The PowerEdge XR7620 server is part of the PowerEdge XR family of servers, all of which are built to handle the most extreme environments while still delivering performance and reliability. We wanted to examine the PowerEdge XR7620 server alongside its “younger siblings,” the PowerEdge XR4000 series servers, and investigate the intra-generational differences in the PowerEdge XR family. (While not discussed in this study, the PowerEdge XR8000 series servers provide excellent flexibility and stability, and would be the “elder sibling” in the family.)

The VMmark results show the PowerEdge XR7620 server can achieve more performance across more tiles (fourteen versus four). These results also illustrate what can be achieved at the edge with a full, dual-socket server using the latest-generation processors in a short depth, 2U ruggedized chassis at the edge. While the PowerEdge XR7620 server’s overall performance wins are expected, what’s missing is how performant at the edge the PowerEdge XR4000 series servers are. Given the smaller size and shorter form factor overall, the PowerEdge XR4000 series servers are very performant relative to size, and they are an excellent option when a smaller, denser, more flexible deployment is called for. Moreover, their redundancy allows for more hardware failures, making them resilient and durable.

VMware vSAN is widely deployed as a virtualization software and hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) solution, so we compared vSAN deployments inter-generationally as well. While both servers take advantage of vSAN, the PowerEdge XR7620 server will offer more overall performance, whereas PowerEdge XR4000 series servers offer the highest density in the smallest form factor.

There is, however, another significant benefit to the upgraded PowerEdge XR7620 server: power savings and sustainability. As shown in our technical research study, the PowerEdge XR7620 server offers double the cores of the PowerEdge XR4510c server tested, for less than double the wattage, resulting in a smaller power draw when the PowerEdge XR7620 is deployed at the edge. The reduced power consumption can also potentially lower total cost of ownership (TCO) and help meet your business’s sustainability goals.

Finding an Edge Within the PowerEdge XR Family

Our research concludes that the Dell PowerEdge XR family of servers is a great option for organizations looking for reliable, high-performing servers in ruggedized, short-depth form factors designed specifically for edge computing. Among the range of PowerEdge XR family servers examined by Prowess Consulting, the PowerEdge XR7620 server represents a solid upgrade from the previous generation, and it is the performance-focused offering in the new PowerEdge XR family of servers. PowerEdge XR4000 series servers are the high-density, performant option when durability and space constraints are primary concerns.

Learn More

For full research results and configuration details, see the technical research report at https://infohub.delltechnologies.com/p/a-path-to-virtualization-at-the-edge.

For more information on the Dell PowerEdge XR7620 server, see “Dell’s PowerEdge XR7620 for Telecom/Edge Compute” and the PowerEdge XR7620 server product page.

For more information on the new offerings in the PowerEdge XR family, see “Dell PowerEdge Gets Edgy with XR8000, XR7620, and XR5610 Servers.

[1] Intel. Performance Index (4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable Processors, G1). Accessed May 2023. www.intel.com/PerformanceIndex.

[2] Intel. Performance Index (4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable Processors, N18). Accessed May 2023. www.intel.com/PerformanceIndex.

[3] Intel. Performance Index (4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable Processors, N16). Accessed May 2023. www.intel.com/PerformanceIndex.


Read Full Blog
  • PowerEdge
  • virtualization
  • edge
  • XR
  • XR7620

A Path to Virtualization at the Edge

Manya Rastogi Manya Rastogi

Thu, 17 Aug 2023 18:44:38 -0000

|

Read Time: 0 minutes

 

Get next-generation performance at the edge from the Dell PowerEdge XR family of servers

Executive Summary

Edge sensors and devices generate data on a massive scale. And much of the data is generated in rugged environments. Heavy machinery used in underground mining operations, for example, can be outfitted with smart sensors to monitor gas concentrations, air quality, and temperature. Once this data is captured by a high-performance edge server, an analytics application processes the data to generate real-time insights.

Prowess Consulting investigated options for organizations looking for rugged edge servers with the performance needed for compute-intensive analytics. We started by evaluating the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server, a member of Dell Technologies’ PowerEdge XR rugged servers portfolio. We looked at performance, durability, and compliance to military and telecom industry standards.

We then compared the PowerEdge XR7620 server to the PowerEdge XE2420 server, a previous-generation rugged edge server, and observed significant generational performance gains. Finally, we compared the PowerEdge XR7620 server to another member of the PowerEdge XR family, the PowerEdge XR4000 series servers. This helped us summarize key differences between the PowerEdge XR7620 server and the PowerEdge XR4000 series. We found that, for organizations looking for the ideal edge server, the PowerEdge XR7620 server delivers high performance, including excellent virtualization capabilities and VMware vSAN™ performance, whereas the PowerEdge XR4000 series servers deliver excellent density and deployment flexibility.

Life at the Edge

Modern businesses are processing more data at the edge. This brings a unique set of requirements for edge servers: the need for high performance, the ability for a server to fit into tiny spaces, and the ability to tolerate the extremes of remote field deployments whether on a manufacturing floor or in a busy retail environment.

Workloads like data analytics and AI/ML that process data at the edge drive the need for high performance. Decoupled from your data center, servers at the edge combat a host of environmental and logistical challenges. A factory that combines Internet of Things (IoT) and digital twin technologies to automate resource allocation and optimize efficiency through analytics and AI will need servers on the factory floor to generate actionable data. And that means exposure to heat, vibration, dust, and more.

How your organization addresses the dual considerations of performance and durability inherent to edge computing is key. Regardless of your solution, maximizing performance and safeguarding against harsh environments is critical.

The PowerEdge XR7620 Server: Performance and Durability at the Edge

Performance

Research by Prowess Consulting shows that the new PowerEdge XR7620 server, powered by 4th Gen Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors, can meet the challenges of ensuring performance and durability. The PowerEdge XR7620 server is a two-socket server featuring data center–level compute with high performance, high capacity, and reduced latency. Moreover, its rugged form factor ensures performance-protecting durability, from military deployments to the factory floor. The PowerEdge XR7620 server can process and analyze data at the point of capture for maximum impact when away from the data center. Given its high performance, the PowerEdge XR7620 server excels at tasks like virtualization.

The PowerEdge XR7620 server also offers compact GPU- and CPU-optimized variants to further customize performance.

Durability

The PowerEdge XR7620 server—like the entire PowerEdge XR family—is purpose-built to withstand the most extreme environments. It can handle dust, humidity, extreme temperatures, shocks, and more. And it’s both MIL-STD-810G and Network Equipment Building System (NEBS) Level 3, GR-3108 Class 1, tested[1].  This means the PowerEdge XR7620 server is compliant with edge-computing standards for both the telecom industry (NEBS Level 3) and military-related applications (MIL-STD-810G). These are foundational requirements, and we dove deeper into their importance.

NEBS Level 3

“NEBS describes the environment of a typical United States Regional Bell Operating Company (RBOC) central office. NEBS is the most common set of safety, spatial, and environmental design standards applied to telecommunications equipment in the United States. It is not a legal or regulatory requirement, but rather an industry requirement.”[2]

NEBS levels relate primarily to the telecom industry and are rated 1–3. Whereas NEBS Levels 1 and 2 are essentially office-based and targeted toward more controlled environments like data centers, NEBS Level 3 is the standard. It’s what telecom and network providers base their installation requirements on, as this level ensures equipment operability.  It also requires the most time, effort, and cost in terms of design and maintenance.

Table 1 illustrates the specific requirements for NEBS Level 3.

Table 1.  NEBS Level 3 requirements[3]

MIL-STD

“This Standard contains materiel acquisition program planning and engineering direction for considering the influences that environmental stresses have on materiel throughout all phases of its service life. It is important to note that this document [the MIL-STD-810G standard] does not impose design or test specifications. Rather, it describes the environmental tailoring process that results in realistic materiel designs and test methods based on materiel system performance requirements.”[4]

A military standard (MIL-STD) is a US defense standard that centers around ensuring standardization and interoperability for the products used by the US Department of Defense (DoD). There are different standards for specific use cases and industries, and the PowerEdge XR7620 server specifically addresses the 810G standard. The 810G standard centers around environmental engineering and testing, and it provides a rigorous framework—rather than universal guidelines—for vetting potential deployments through extensive testing.

Figure 1 shows a decision tree from the 810G standard guidelines that illustrates how rigorous and extensive the requirements for testing are to meet 810G compliance.

Figure 1.  A decision tree from the MIL-STD-810G guidelines[5]

The PowerEdge XR7620 Server: A New Generation

Prowess Consulting examined the performance difference between the PowerEdge XR7620 server and the previous-generation PowerEdge XE2420 server. We began by comparing the processors between the generations.

The 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors that power the PowerEdge XR7620 server provide a number of benefits over the 2nd Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors that power the PowerEdge XE2420 server. These benefits include:

  • 1.53x average generation-on-generation performance improvement[6]
  • Up to 1.60x higher input/output operations per second (IOPS) and up to 37% latency reduction for large-packet sequential reads using integrated Intel® Data Streaming Accelerator (Intel® DSA) versus the prior generation[7]
  • Up to 95% fewer cores and 2x higher level-1 compression throughput using integrated Intel® QuickAssist Technology (Intel® QAT) versus the prior generation[8]

We then reviewed the top-line specs between the PowerEdge XE2420 server and the PowerEdge XR7620 server, shown in Table 3 in the Methodology section. These specs show a clear and consistent improvement between generations. Further analysis of SPEC® CPU 2017 Integer and Floating Point (FP) rates—both of which measure CPU processing power by integer and floating point rates, respectively—shows the same generational increase, with the PowerEdge XR7620 server and its 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors the clear winner. These results are shown in Figures 2 and 3.

Figure 2.  SPEC® CPU INT Rate for the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server (with an Intel® Xeon® Gold 6448Y processor) versus the PowerEdge XE2420 server (with Intel Xeon Gold 6252, Intel Xeon Gold 6252N, and Intel Xeon Gold 6238 processors)[9]

Figure 3.  SPEC® CPU FP rate for the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server (with an Intel® Xeon® Gold 6448Y processor) versus the PowerEdge XE2420 server (with Intel Xeon Gold 6252, Intel Xeon Gold 6252N, and Intel Xeon Gold 6238 processors)9

This performance improvement between generations can also be seen by comparing VMware vSAN deployments. The PowerEdge XE2420 server and the PowerEdge XR7620 server can both implement two-node vSAN deployments. However, as noted previously, the PowerEdge XR7620 server will be more performant with those deployments. This higher level of performance doesn’t just come from the upgraded processor, either. The 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors in the PowerEdge XR7620 are optimized to take full advantage of the new features and software improvements in VMware vSphere® 8, including GPU- and CPU-based acceleration.

The PowerEdge XR Family

Before we examine the Dell PowerEdge XR family of servers in more detail, Figure 4 provides a quick visual reference of the servers discussed in this report.

  1. Venn diagram of the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XE2420, XR7620, and XR4000 series servers

VMmark® Examination of PowerEdge XR7620 and PowerEdge XR4000 Series Servers

The PowerEdge XR7620 server is part of the PowerEdge XR family of servers, all of which are built to handle the most extreme environments while still delivering performance and reliability. We wanted to examine the PowerEdge XR7620 server alongside some of its “younger siblings,” the PowerEdge XR4000 series servers, and investigate the inter-generational differences. (While not discussed in this study, PowerEdge XR8000 series servers provide excellent flexibility and stability, and would be the “elder sibling” in the family.)

To do this, we analyzed VMmark® results for both the PowerEdge XR4510c (representing the PowerEdge XR4000 series) and the PowerEdge XR7620, shown in Table 4 in the Methodology section. VMmark is a tool for hardware vendors and others to measure the performance, scalability, and power consumption of virtualization platforms. VMmark allows for: benchmarking of virtual data center performance and power consumption; comparing performance and power consumption between different virtualization platforms; and examining how changes in hardware, software, or configuration affect performance within the virtualization environment.[10]

The VMmark results show the PowerEdge XR7620 server can achieve more performance across more tiles (fourteen versus four). These results also illustrate what can be achieved with a full, dual-socket server with the latest-generation processors in a short-depth, 2U ruggedized chassis at the edge. Moreover, the 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors in the PowerEdge XR7620 server also account for the higher performance. While the PowerEdge XR7620 server’s overall performance wins are expected, what’s missing is how performant at the edge PowerEdge XR4000 series servers are. Given the smaller size and shorter form factor overall, the PowerEdge XR4000 series servers are very performant relative to size, and they are an excellent option when a smaller, denser, more flexible deployment is called for. Moreover, their redundancy allows for more hardware failures, making them resilient and durable.

  1. Optional witness node on the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR4000 series servers[11]

VMware vSAN is an “enterprise-class storage virtualization software that provides the simplest path to hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) and multi-cloud.”[12]  VMware vSAN is widely deployed, so we also compared vSAN deployments inter-generationally. While the PowerEdge XR7620 server (and PowerEdge XE2420 server, too) can implement two-node vSAN deployments, PowerEdge XR4000 series servers can implement four-node vSAN deployments. Additionally, the PowerEdge XR7620 server can also be deployed in a two-node architecture using a vSAN witness appliance to take advantage of the many benefits of vSAN—especially its performance benefits. While both servers take advantage of vSAN, the PowerEdge XR7620 server will offer more overall performance, whereas PowerEdge XR4000 series servers offer the highest density in the smallest form factor.

There is, however, another significant benefit to the upgraded PowerEdge XR7620 server: power savings and sustainability. As Table 4 in the Methodology section shows, the PowerEdge XR7620 server offers double the cores of the PowerEdge XR4510c server tested for less than double the wattage, resulting in a smaller power draw when the PowerEdge XR7620 is deployed the edge. The PowerEdge XR7620 server reduces power consumption, leading to higher energy efficiency and power availability for the PowerEdge XR7620 server. The reduced power consumption can also potentially lower total cost of ownership (TCO) and help meet your business’s sustainability goals.

Potential PowerEdge XR Family Use Cases

The PowerEdge XR family of servers has use cases in retail, manufacturing, defense, and telecom. We explore two specific use cases in the following sections.

The PowerEdge XR7620 Server: Autonomous Driving

Let’s examine how the PowerEdge XR7620 server—which excels at virtualization—might perform in a real-world setting in the auto industry. As demand increases for technologies such as advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving capabilities, the industry needs more efficient development and testing. Virtualization is a key strategy for generating this efficiency, and it’s leading to a change in the way vehicles are designed, developed, manufactured, tested, and maintained.[13]

As software becomes increasingly essential to the average vehicle, updating that software as efficiently as possible becomes a customer pain point and a business requirement. Vast amounts of data are generated when physically testing the update process in the factory or out on the track. You’ll need a high-performance server to capture and process that data as it’s generated for the fastest analytics and most actionable insights possible. Moreover, the 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors in the PowerEdge XR7620 server are optimized to use the software upgrades in vSphere 8, allowing you to modernize your hardware and software as you replace aging assets, while increasing capacity.

Additionally, this server must be able to withstand the dust and temperature fluctuations of the factory, or the vibrations and humidity of the track, or a host of other adverse conditions. The PowerEdge XR7620 server meets both performance and durability needs, offering the levels of performance required for intense data analytics and the ruggedized form factor required at the edge.

PowerEdge XR4000 Series Servers: Telecom Deployments

Let’s take a proper look at PowerEdge XR4000 series servers now. If the PowerEdge XR7620 server is at home on the factory floor, then the PowerEdge XR4000 series server is at home under the cell tower. While the PowerEdge XR7620 server is built for durability, PowerEdge XR4000 series servers are especially rugged and come in Dell’s smallest form factor for flexibility and customization in the most difficult deployments. They are NEBS Level 3 and MIL-STD-810H tested.[14]  Moreover, their four sleds in a single 2U chassis offer excellent scalability and portability when in the field. They have “rackable” and “stackable” configuration options for maximum deployment flexibility, and they support multiple configurations within each option. And PowerEdge XR4000 series servers do so while still offering the high performance needed for analytics and virtualization at the edge.

Finding an Edge Within the PowerEdge XR Family

While the PowerEdge XR family of servers all feature a ruggedized, short-depth form factor, there’s a spectrum of purpose-built options to consider, varying from maximum performance at one end to maximum density and durability at the other.

As our research shows, the PowerEdge XR7620 server is an excellent choice for maximum performance within the PowerEdge family of servers examined. It’s powered by the next-generation Intel Xeon Gold 6448Y processor, giving the PowerEdge XR7620 server excellent virtualization capabilities and vSAN performance. And the PowerEdge XR7620 server does all this in a ruggedized, short-depth form factor that provides the durability required for intense edge computing.

The PowerEdge XR7620 Server: Under the Hood

The performance of the PowerEdge XR7620 server shouldn’t be seen as a simple generational update. It owes some of its performance to the 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors and the Dell™ PowerEdge RAID Controller 12 (PERC 12).

Intel® Xeon® Gold 6448Y Processor

The Intel Xeon Gold 6448Y processor found in the PowerEdge XR7620 server is based on 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processor architecture, representing a serious upgrade from 2nd and 3rd Gen processors in several ways. With double the cores, a higher max turbo frequency, and a larger cache than the previous model’s processor, the Intel Xeon Gold 6448Y processor is built for performance. Moreover, the processor features Intel DSA, which helps speed up data movement and improve transformation operations to increase performance for storage, networking, and data-intensive workloads.[15]

Dell™ PERC 12

PERC 12, Dell’s latest RAID controller, features the new Broadcom® SAS4116W series chip and offers increased capabilities compared with its predecessor, PERC 11. These capabilities include support for 24 gigabits per second (Gb/s) Serial-Attached SCSI (SAS) drives, increased cache memory speed, and a single front controller that supports both NVM Express® (NVMe®) and SAS. Table 2 shows the generational improvement between PERC 11 and PERC 12.[16]

Table 2.  IOPS/bandwidth comparison between the Dell™ PERC 11 and PERC 12 controllers16

PowerEdge XR4000 Series Servers: Inside the Box

At the density end of the spectrum, we have the PowerEdge XR4000 series servers. These are Dell Technologies’ shortest-depth servers to date: modular 2U servers with a sled-based design for maximum flexibility. They come in two new 14”-depth form factors called “rackable” and “stackable,” and they offer rack or wall mounting options.

PowerEdge XR4000 series servers also feature an optional nano-server-sled that can serve as an in-chassis witness node for the vSAN cluster. This replaces the need for a virtual witness node and establishes a native, self-contained, two-node vSAN cluster—even in the 14” x 12” stackable configuration. You can choose between two and four nodes in a chassis while still using vSAN because of the in-chassis witness node. This makes virtual machine (VM) deployments possible where latency or bandwidth constraints previously prevented doing so. PowerEdge XR4000 series servers offer high-performance edge computing in a form factor small enough to fit in a backpack.[17]  This form factor and size also lead to high computing density, which is the measurement of the amount of information that can be stored and processed in a given area to determine efficient use of space.

When Rugged Matters as Much as Performance

Our research concludes that the Dell PowerEdge XR family of servers is a great option for organizations looking for reliable, high-performing servers in ruggedized, short-depth form factors designed specifically for edge computing. Among the range of PowerEdge XR family servers examined by Prowess, the PowerEdge XR7620 server represents a solid upgrade from the previous generation, and is the performance-focused offering in the new PowerEdge XR family of servers. PowerEdge XR4000 series servers are the high-density, performant option when durability and space constraints are primary concerns.

Learn More

For more information on the Dell PowerEdge XR7620 server, see “Dell’s PowerEdge XR7620 for Telecom/Edge Compute” and the PowerEdge XR7620 server product page.

For more information on the new offerings in the PowerEdge XR family, see “Dell PowerEdge Gets Edgy with XR8000, XR7620, and XR5610 Servers.”

Methodology

Table 3 shows the configuration details for the comparison between the PowerEdge XE2420 server and the PowerEdge XR7620 server.

Table 3.  Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server versus PowerEdge XE2420 server comparison

Server

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XE2420[18],[19],[20]

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620[21],[22]

Processor

2nd Gen Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors

4th Gen Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors

Cores per Processor

Up to 24

Up to 32

Number of Processors Supported

2

2

Memory

16 x DDR4 RDIMM/LR-DIMM (12 DIMMs are balanced), up to 2,993 megatransfers per second (MT/s)

16 x DDR5 DIMM slots, supports RDIMM 1 TB max, speeds up to 4,800 MT/s; supports registered error correction code (ECC) DDR5 DIMMs only

Drive Bays

Up to 4 x 2.5-inch SAS/SATA/NVMe® solid-state drives (SSDs); up to 6 Enterprise and Data Center SSD Form Factor (EDSFF) drives

Front bays: Up to 4 x 2.5-inch SAS/SATA/NVMe® SSDs, 61.44 TB max; up to 8 x E3.S NVMe® direct drives, 51.2 TB max

Dimensions

2 x 2.5-inches or 4 x 2.5 with seven possible configurations

Rear-accessed configuration:

  • Height: 86.8 mm (3.41 inches)
  • Width: 482.6 mm (19 inches)
  • Depth: 448.8 mm (17.6 inches) ear to rear wall
  • 496.3 mm (19.53 inches) with bezel
  • 471.8 mm (18.57 inches) without bezel

Front accessed configuration:

  • Height: 86.8 mm (3.41 inches)
  • Width: 482.6 mm (19 inches)
  • Depth: 572 mm (22.51 inches) with bezel
  • 471.8 mm (18.57 inches) without bezel

Weight

17.36 kg (38.19 pounds) to 18.93 kg (41.65 pounds), depending on configuration

Max 21.16 kg (46.64 pounds)

Form Factor

2U rack

2U rack

Table 4 shows the configuration details for the VMmark comparison between the two PowerEdge XR family servers.

Table 4,  VMmark® comparison between the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server and the PowerEdge XR4510c server

VMmark® 3.1.1 Results

Summary

Category

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR4510c[23]

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620[24]

VMmark® 3 Average Watts

1,085.50

1,878.63

VMmark® 3 Applications Score

4.93

14.08

VMmark® 3 Infrastructure Score

2.15

1.06

VMmark® 3 Score

4.37

11.48

VMmark® 3 PPKW

4.0285 at 4 tiles

6.1093 at 14 tiles

Configuration

Server

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR4510c23

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR762024

Nodes

4 physical (with local hardware-based witness node)

2 (with VMware vSAN™ witness appliance)

Storage

VMware vSAN™ 8.0—all-flash

VMware vSAN™ 8.0—all-flash

Hypervisor

VMware ESXi™ 8.0 GA, build 20513097

VMware ESXi™ 8.0b, build 21203435

Data Center Management Software

VMware vCenter Server® 8.0 GA, build 20519528

VMware vCenter Server® 8.0c, build 21457384

Number of Servers in System Under Test

4

2

Processor

Intel® Xeon® D-2776NT processor

Intel® Xeon® Gold 6448Y processor

Processor Speed (GHz)/Intel® Turbo Boost Technology Speed (GHz)

2.10 GHz/3.20 GHz

2.10 GHz/4.10 GHz

Total Sockets/Cores/Threads in Test

4 sockets/64 cores/128 threads

4 sockets/128 cores/256 threads

Memory Size (in GB, Number of DIMMs)

512 GB, 4

2,048 GB, 16

Memory Type and Speed

128 GB 4Rx4 DDR4 3,200 MT/s LRDIMM

128 GB DDR5 4Rx4 4,800 MT/s RDIMMs

The analysis in this document was done by Prowess Consulting and commissioned by Dell Technologies.

Results have been simulated and are provided for informational purposes only. Any difference in system hardware or software design or configuration may affect actual performance.

Prowess Consulting and the Prowess logo are trademarks of Prowess Consulting, LLC.

Copyright © 2023 Prowess Consulting, LLC. All rights reserved.

Other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

[1] Dell. “Dell’s PowerEdge XR7620 for Telecom/Edge Compute.” May 2023. https://infohub.delltechnologies.com/p/dell-s-poweredge-xr7620-for-telecom-edge-compute/.

[2] Cisco. “Cisco Firepower 4112, 4115, 4125, and 4145 Hardware Installation Guide.” June 2023. www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/security/firepower/41x5/hw/guide/install-41x5.html.

[3] Dell. “Computing on the Edge: NEBS Criteria Levels.” November 2022. https://infohub.delltechnologies.com/p/computing-on-the-edge-nebs-criteria-levels/.

[4] MIL-STD-810. “Environmental Engineering Considerations and Laboratory Tests.” May 2022. https://quicksearch.dla.mil/qsDocDetails.aspx?ident_number=35978.

[5] US Department of Defense. “Environmental Engineering Considerations And Laboratory Tests.” Revision G Change 1 (change incorporated). Figure 402-1. Life Cycle Environmental Profile Development Guide. April 2014. https://quicksearch.dla.mil/qsDocDetails.aspx?ident_number=35978 [then select the "Revision G Change 1 (change incorporated)" document].

[6] Intel. Performance Index (4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable Processors, G1). Accessed May 2023. www.intel.com/PerformanceIndex.

[7] Intel. Performance Index (4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable Processors, N18). Accessed May 2023. www.intel.com/PerformanceIndex.

[8] Intel. Performance Index (4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable Processors, N16). Accessed May 2023. www.intel.com/PerformanceIndex.

[9] Data provided by Dell Technologies in May 2023.

[10] VMware. “VMmark.” Accessed June 2023. www.vmware.com/products/vmmark.html.

[11] Dell. "XR4000w Multi-Node Edge Server (Intel)." Accessed July 2023. https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/ipovw/poweredge-xr4000w.

[12] VMware. “What Is VMware vSAN?” Accessed July 2023. www.vmware.com/products/vsan.html.

[13] Luxoft. “Achieving the benefits of SDVs using virtualization.” May 2023. www.luxoft.com/blog/virtualization-revolutionizing-software-defined-vehicles-development.

[15] Intel. “Intel® Accelerator Engines.” Accessed June 2023. www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/accelerator-engines/overview.html.

[16] Dell. “Dell PowerEdge RAID Controller 12.” May 2023. https://infohub.delltechnologies.com/p/dell-poweredge-raid-controller-12/.

[17] Dell. “VMmark on XR4000.” January 2023. https://infohub.delltechnologies.com/p/vmmark-on-xr4000/.

[19] Dell. “Dell EMC PowerEdge XE2420 Technical Specifications.” Accessed June 2023. https://dl.dell.com/topicspdf/poweredge-xe2420_reference-guide_en-us.pdf.

[20] Dell. “PowerEdge XE2420 Specification Sheet.” Accessed June 2023. https://i.dell.com/sites/csdocuments/Product_Docs/en/PowerEdge-XE2420-Spec-Sheet.pdf.

[22] Dell. “PowerEdge XR7620 Specification Sheet.” Accessed June 2023. www.delltechnologies.com/asset/en-us/products/servers/technical-support/poweredge-xr7620-spec-sheet.pdf.

Read Full Blog
  • PowerEdge
  • XR
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Intel 4th Gen Xeon

Dell PowerEdge XR Edge AI Smart City Solutions

Manya Rastogi Scalers AI‚Ñ¢ Manya Rastogi Scalers AI‚Ñ¢

Mon, 10 Apr 2023 04:43:07 -0000

|

Read Time: 0 minutes

Scalers AI™ tested the latest generation Dell PowerEdge XR 5610 and XR7620 servers for Smart City Solution. Their smart cities solution uses artificial intelligence and computer vision to monitor real-time traffic safety.

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR5610 system showed better performance compared to Dell™ PowerEdge™XR11system for AI inference and decoding tasks using the TinyYoloV4 model with INT8 precision and the Intel®OpenVINO™ framework. Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR5610 system had a 2.5x improvement in AI inference on images and a 1.77x improvement in AI inference and decoding on video at 1080 P resolution. When running Scalers AI application, which includes AI inference, decoding a video stream, and application services, the Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR5610 system had a 1.9x improvement in performance.

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR5610 has us covered for real-world deployments in harsh conditions requiring compact form factors that can withstand dust, vibration, extreme temperatures, and humidity. For more compute, Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 offers two 4th Gen Intel® Xeon® Scalable Processors, and we saw near-linear scale in our AI and video decode workloads making Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR ideal for high-performance application deployment in harsh environments.

Fast-track development with access to the solution code:

Contact your Dell™ representative or Scalers AI™ at contact@scalers.ai for access. Save hundreds of hours of development with the solution code. As part of this effort, ScalersAI™ is making the solution code available.

Read Full Blog
  • Intel
  • PowerEdge
  • XR
  • Intel 4th Gen Xeon

Are Rugged Compact Platforms Ready for Edge AI?

Manya Rastogi Scalers AI‚Ñ¢ Manya Rastogi Scalers AI‚Ñ¢

Mon, 10 Apr 2023 04:43:06 -0000

|

Read Time: 0 minutes

Scalers AI™ tested the Impellers Defect Inspection at the Edge on the Dell PowerEdge XR5610 server. Impellers are rotating components used in various industrial processes, including fluid handling in pumps and fans. Quality inspection of impellers is crucial to ensure their reliable performance and durability.

Dell™ PowerEdge™XR5610 Server supports 50 simultaneous streams running AI defect detection in a single CPU config with Dell™PowerEdge™ XR Portfolio offering scalability to 4CPUs at a near-linear scale. 1.4x Gen on Gen Performance Improvement Using Intel® Deep Learning Boost and Intel® OpenVINO™ Smart Factory Solution | Defect Detection Solution.

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR 5610 servers, equipped with fourth Gen Intel® Xeon® scalable processors, are well suited to handle Edge AI applications with both AI inference and training at the Edge. The rugged form factor, extended temp, and scalability to four sockets enable compute to be deployed in the physical world closer to the point of data creation, allowing for near-real-time insights.

Fast-track development with access to the solution code:

Contact your Dell™ representative or Scalers AI™ at contact@scalers.ai for access. Save hundreds of hours of development with the solution code. As part of this effort, ScalersAI™ is making the solution code available.




Read Full Blog
  • PowerEdge
  • XR
  • Intel 4th Gen Xeon

Intel Edge Insights for Industrial Software

Manya Rastogi Scalers AI‚Ñ¢ Manya Rastogi Scalers AI‚Ñ¢

Mon, 10 Apr 2023 04:43:07 -0000

|

Read Time: 0 minutes

Scalers AI™ tested Intel® Edge Insights for Industrial Software package on the latest generation Dell PowerEdge XR 5610 and XR7620 servers for printed circuit board Defect Inspection and Worker Safety use cases.

Dell™ XR5610 Performance Insights with 4th Gen Intel® Xeon® 5 scalable processors using Intel® Deep Learning Boost with Advanced Matrix Extensions results in 1.6x performance from prior generation on Industrial AI workloads.

Dell™ XR portfolio includes 2U dual socket Dell™ XR7620 and 2U sled-based XR8000 along with 1U Single Socket Dell™ XR5610, offering flexibility and scalability with highly configurable options for CPU, memory, and I/O needed for Edge and Telecom applications.

Fast-track development with access to the solution code:

Contact your Dell™ representative or Scalers AI™ at contact@scalers.ai for access. Save hundreds of hours of development with the solution code. As part of this effort, ScalersAI™ is making the solution code available.

Read Full Blog
  • deep learning
  • NVIDIA
  • PowerEdge
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • XR7620

AI Driven Pop-up Manufacturing Made Possible with PowerEdge XR7620

Chetan Gadgil Manya Rastogi Delmar Hernandez Scalers AI‚Ñ¢ Stephen Graham Chetan Gadgil Manya Rastogi Delmar Hernandez Scalers AI‚Ñ¢ Stephen Graham

Tue, 20 Jun 2023 15:49:53 -0000

|

Read Time: 0 minutes

| Executive Summary

As traditional manufacturing processes are being gradually replaced by advanced technology, deep learning, 3D printing, and open programmable robotics offer an unprecedented opportunity to accelerate this transformation and deliver high quality, personalized products more affordably. 

To demonstrate this opportunity we took on a challenge to showcase AI pop-up manufacturing by 3D printing orthopaedic components, specifically acetabular liners used in hip replacement surgeries and running them through a robotic arm & AI quality inspection and a sorting process, with worker safety embedded within. 

This solution was both developed and deployed on Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 purpose built for the edge with NVIDIA® A100 tensor core GPUs, including the custom acetabular liner defect detection model. 

The proof of concept resulting in a live demo was completed within a quarter from the AI development, to the mechanical work to create a custom gripper, to the robotic arm assembly programming and AI integration. The live demo was successfully set-up and deployed in a day and ran for three days.

  • 50% saving in engineering time to reach targeted 1.2 second latency across application with Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620
  • Three AI models running on Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 to enable Industrial Transformation

We trained our defect defection model for acetabular liners on Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 and deployed it on the same system at the edge. We also ran our worker safety model and segment anything model, all in the compact rugged edge form factor.

- Steen Graham, CEO at Scalers AI™

  

| Industry Challenge

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons reports more than 300,000 hip replacements are performed annually. Defective hip implants can lead to complications and high-cost revision surgeries. According to the FDA, over 500,000 people in the United States have been injured by defective hip implants. A study published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found that patients with defective hip implants were 3.5 times more likely to need revision surgery. The same study found that patients with defective hip implants were 2.5 times more likely to experience series complications such as infection, dislocation, and fracture. 

Further, the cost of the artificial hip and liner can range into the thousands with the overall surgery range from $20,000 to $45,000 according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, with revision surgery even higher.

| Solution Architecture


| The Concept

Demonstrate how we can improve production and quality inspection with the latest techniques in deep learning to reduce the likelihood of defective hip implants, while lowering the manufacturing cost. Ultimately, showing how modern techniques in AI, 3D printing, and robotics can improve patient safety and reduce costs.

Note: ~50% time savings estimated based on engineering resources applied in development (~2000 hours) and estimated incremental time required to label, train, custom API development, and post training optimization (~2000 hours).

| Robotics

A 7-axis robotic arm and custom gripper was developed specifically for the demo to pick up acetabular liners within a few months. The robot controller is integrated with the AI APIs to pick up the liners and run defect detection. The robotic arm picks up the liners and rotates them under the camera to enable the defect detection. Then, the robot places the liners in different buckets based on whether they pass or fail the quality inspection.

The NexCOBOT robotic controller and 7-axis robotic arm were integrated with Scalers AI™ APIs and run on Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server. 

| Deep Learning Models

The deep learning model involves three Neural Networks (NNs), including the latest Segment Anything model (SAM) for object detection, and a custom model built specifically to detect defects in acetabular liners, as well as a workers safety model. The custom model showcases the ability to build high-performance models using modest-sized datasets. 

| Demo

Dashboards | Defect Detection

Quality Inspection Process

  • During the quality control, no defects have been detected on the liner picked up. The robot arm will then place it in the bucket dedicated to non defective hip implants.

  • Three defects have been detected on this acetabular liner. The robot arm will place it in the bucket for hip implants who did not pass the quality inspection. 

Dashboards | Worker Safety

  • One worker has been detected in the hazard zone triggering a worker safety notification. 

| Integration of Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 Server

Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server, designed to withstand harsh industrial conditions, houses two Intel® Xeon® Scalable Processors and two NVIDIA® A100 Tensor Core GPUs and KIOXIA SSDs within its 472mm chassis. Its ruggedized design, combined with NVIDIA® A100 GPUs offer powerful parallel processing capabilities, enables real-time analysis of 3D-printed components and rapid defect detection.

| Developed time saving on Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 Server

By selecting the powerful Dell™ PowerEdge™ XR7620 server we are able to make this demonstration possible within a few months. Selecting a CPU or entry level GPU edge platform would have resulted in ~50% increase in development time for additional data labeling, training, custom API development, and post training optimization. This all would be required to reach our minimum latency requirement of sub 1.2 seconds for the object detection and defect detection models.

Note: ~50% time savings estimated based on engineering resources applied in development (~2000 hours) and estimated incremental time required to label, train, custom API development, and post training optimization (~2000 hours).

| Dell Technology™ World 23’

AI Driven Pop-Up Manufaturing Demo 

 

| Conclusion

Our demo has potential implications in revolutionizing orthopedic implant manufacturing. The amalgamation of 3D printing, deep learning, and open programmable robots may provide a flexible, efficient, and affordable manufacturing solution for orthopedic components. The incorporation of Dell™ ruggedized PowerEdge™ XR7620 server and NVIDIA® powerful GPUs ensures reliable and real-time defect detection, proving essential in reducing production delays.

As our proof of concept gains further refinement, we anticipate its adoption in various other manufacturing domains, bringing in a new era of efficiency and precision.

About Scalers AI™

Scalers AI™ specializes in creating end-to-end artificial intelligence (AI) solutions for a wide range of industries, including retail, smart cities, manufacturing, and healthcare. The company is dedicated to helping organizations leverage the power of AI for their digital transformation. Scalers AI™ has a team of experienced AI developers and data scientists who are skilled in creating custom AI solutions for a variety of use cases, including predictive analytics, chatbots, image and speech recognition, and natural language processing.

As a full stack AI solutions company with solutions ranging from the cloud to the edge, our customers often need versatile common off the shelf (COTS) hardware that works well across a range of workloads. Additionally, we also need advanced visualization libraries including the ability to render video in modern web application architectures.

| Fast track development with access to the solution code

Save hundreds of hours of development with the solution code. As part of this effort Scalers AI™ is making the solution code available.

Reach out to your Dell™ representative or contact Scalers AI™ at contact@scalers.ai for access.

Resources

  • Reach out to your Dell™ representative or contact Scalers AI™ for access to the code!

contact@scalers.ai

This project was commissioned by Dell Technologies™ and conducted by Scalers AI, Inc. 

Scalers AI™and Scalers AI™ logos are trademarks of Scalers AI, Inc.

Copyright © 2023 Scalers AI, Inc.

All rights reserved.

Other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Author:

Steen Graham CEO at Scalers AI™

Chetan Gadgil CTO at Scalers AI™

Delmar Hernandez, Server Technologist at Dell Technologies™ 

Manya Rastogi, Server Technologist at Dell Technologies™

Read Full Blog